Store

News Releases

Facebook   Twitter
Crop Science Society of America
5585 Guilford Road • Madison, WI 53711-5801 • 608-273-8080 • Fax 608-273-2021
www.crops.org
Twitter | Facebook | RSS News Release Feed

NEWS RELEASE
Contact: Susan V. Fisk, Public Relations Director, 608-273-8091, sfisk@sciencesocieties.org

Legume crops good for soil fertility, smallholder farmers

Public education, training programs key to legume-based agriculture success

Media Invitation
Contact: Susan V. Fisk, 608-273-8091, sfisk@sciencesocieties.org. Please RSVP by October 10, 2017.

Sept. 25, 2017—Protein malnutrition can be caused by low soil fertility, which in turn reduces yields. Food security hinges on this issue.

The “Building Institutional Capacity in Tropical Legumes” symposium planned at the Managing Global Resources for a Secure Future ASA, CSSA, SSSA International Annual Meeting in Tampa, FL, will address this important topic. The symposium will be held Monday, October 23, 2017, at 9:00 AM. The meeting is sponsored by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and the Soil Science Society of America.

“Building strength in legume-based agricultural systems can help address both of these dire problems,” says Kerry Clark, a researcher at the University of Missouri. Clark says building soil fertility will provide smallholder farmers “economic and nutritional alternatives to current staple crops. But a lot of work needs to be done in the countries where the legumes are grown, including public education, training legumes breeders and agronomists, and improving yields so that legumes can compete as viable crops in the tropics.”

Speakers include Mark Westgate, Iowa State University. He will review the work done by Iowa State’s Sustainable Rural Livelihoods program in Uganda. For the past twelve years, the Center has worked with grade school through college level students to increase awareness of tropical legumes and their nutrition, opportunities for entrepreneurship, and plant breeding programs.

Sieglinde Snapp, Michigan State University, will cover the work that Michigan has done with Malawi extension university faculty and students, and farmers. Stephen Boahen will review techniques that the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Mozambique, is using to improve access to quality soybean seeds, use of inputs (fertilizer, water), and best practices to improve yield. Kerry Clark will present work the Soybean Innovation Lab is doing to improve research and breeding in tropically-adapted soybean.

For more information about the 2017 meeting, visit https://www.acsmeetings.org/. Media are invited to attend the conference. Pre-registration by Oct. 10, 2017 is required. Visit https://www.acsmeetings.org/media for registration information. For information about the “Building Institutional Capacity in Tropical Legumes” symposium, visit https://scisoc.confex.com/crops/2017am/webprogram/Session16842.html.

To speak with one of the scientists, contact Susan V. Fisk, 608-273-8091, sfisk@sciencesocieties.org to arrange an interview. 

The Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), founded in 1955, is an international scientific society comprised of 6,000+ members with its headquarters in Madison, WI. Members advance the discipline of crop science by acquiring and disseminating information about crop breeding and genetics; crop physiology; crop ecology, management, and quality; seed physiology, production, and technology; turfgrass science; forage and grazinglands; genomics, molecular genetics, and biotechnology; and biomedical and enhanced plants.

CSSA fosters the transfer of knowledge through an array of programs and services, including publications, meetings, career services, and science policy initiatives. For more information, visit www.crops.org