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Crop Science Society of America
5585 Guilford Road • Madison, WI 53711-5801 • 608-273-8080 • Fax 608-273-2021
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NEWS RELEASE
Contact: Susan V. Fisk, Public Relations Director, 608-273-8091, sfisk@sciencesocieties.org

Carbon cycling in forest soils research presented

Understanding soil in forests can help guide management recommendations

Media Invitation

Contact: Susan V. Fisk, 608-273-8091, sfisk@sciencesocieties.org. Please RSVP by October 10, 2017.

Sept. 12, 2017— Just as individual humans have different microbial communities in their guts, the microbial communities living in soils vary from site to site as well. Recent research compared the decomposition rates of wood stakes over eight sites to gain an understanding of soil microbes in forests. The activity of soil microbes can also tell a story of the value of carbon storage in soil.

The “Belowground Wood Stake Decomposition in Forest Soil” presentation planned at the Managing Global Resources for a Secure Future ASA, CSSA, SSSA International Annual Meeting in Tampa, FL, will address this important topic. The symposium will be held Monday, October 23, 2017, at 8:45 AM. The meeting is sponsored by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and the Soil Science Society of America.

“Because soil carbon is the largest terrestrial carbon pool, understanding how it is regulated has important implications for policy and land management decisions," says presenter Mary Beth Adams, US. Forest Service. "We used standardized wood stakes as an index of belowground decomposition processes, to help us understand how carbon cycles in the soil. “Decomposition of these buried wood stakes was generally fastest at the warmest sites, unless those sites were very wet. The fungal community showed the most variability among the different types of microbes. Generally, the variability of fungi within a site was as great, or greater than, the variability across the eight sites. Thus more than temperature affects wood decomposition; it is also regulated by the soil microbial community, which reflects soil moisture as well.”

For more information about the 2017 meeting, visit https://www.acsmeetings.org/. Media are invited to attend the conference. Pre-registration by Oct. 10, 2017 is required. Visit https://www.acsmeetings.org/media for registration information. For information about the “Belowground Wood Stake Decomposition in Forest Soil” visit https://scisoc.confex.com/crops/2017am/webprogram/Paper105921.html.  

To speak with one of the scientists, contact Susan V. Fisk, 608-273-8091, sfisk@sciencesocieties.org  to arrange an interview. 

The Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), founded in 1955, is an international scientific society comprised of 6,000+ members with its headquarters in Madison, WI. Members advance the discipline of crop science by acquiring and disseminating information about crop breeding and genetics; crop physiology; crop ecology, management, and quality; seed physiology, production, and technology; turfgrass science; forage and grazinglands; genomics, molecular genetics, and biotechnology; and biomedical and enhanced plants.

CSSA fosters the transfer of knowledge through an array of programs and services, including publications, meetings, career services, and science policy initiatives. For more information, visit www.crops.org